Kids Against Hunger? Why not Indianapolis Against Hunger?

Posted: March 13, 2011 in Uncategorized

Over the past few weeks, I have witnessed some amazing contributions to fighting hunger in different parts of the world from a group called Kids Against Hunger (http://www.kidsagainsthunger.org/).  The organization started when a businessman/engineer witnessed misery and starvation around him while with a medical relief team to respond to a hurricane in Honduras in 1974.  He was appalled by the lack of food for the children affected by the hurricane because he knew that children are the future of any society.  After returning from the trip, he met with scientists to begin to formulate a nutritionally-packed meal that could be efficiently and cheaply shipped to the hungry children around the world.  At this point in Kids Against Hunger’s work, they have provided 162 million meals in over 60 countries.

When Ananya Khan from the United Nations Student Alliance (http://www.facebook.com/uindyunsa) approached me about the possibility of co-hosting a Kids Against Hunger event with the Interfaith Forum at the University of Indianapolis, I instantly accepted.  The scope of feeding thousands of children by spending two hours of time with fellow students astounded me.  After securing $500 through allocation with the university, we set a date for the event.  On Tuesday, February 22, around 15 students worked for an hour and a half to feed over 2000 children.  Can you imagine the impact that those meals will have?

When Joe Sanford from Grace United Methodist Church (http://dev.franklingrace.org/) offered to allow me to host the 30-Hour Famine (http://30hourfamine.org/) event with his youth group, I instantly accepted.  As part of my youth ministry class, I am required to perform a youth ministry project, and I saw no better opportunity.  I have participated in starving myself through WorldVision’s 30-Hour Famine to raise money for the past five years, so I was familiar with the event.  Upon signing up for the event, I was not aware that Kids Against Hunger would be present again.  This church had already raised over $10,000 for feeding hungry children, and the volunteer support was incredible.  On Saturday, March 5, over 90 volunteers, including the youth group, packaged over 50,000 meals!  Half of the proceeds would be given to a missionary in Guatemala, while the other half would be given to local food banks and pantries.  At the end of our famine, we were invited to taste-test the food, and we discovered that the meals were tasty, even when nutritious.  Can you imagine the impact that this amount of meals will have?

Through the Better Together Campaign, the Interfaith Youth Core (http://www.ifyc.org/) wishes to have a similar impact on hunger in Indianapolis under the context of interfaith cooperation.  When college students of various faith backgrounds join together with the goal of making the same contributions to hunger, tons of lives will be affected.  Those who will be served will be given the nourishment needed to survive and flourish in their daily lives.  Those who will serve will be contributing to a large social cause while actively understanding the nature of a shared call to action between different religious and philosophical backgrounds.  While the large-scale service project between UIndy, IUPUI, Butler, Franklin, and Marian has not been verified at this point in time, ideas floating around suggest that we be working to pack meals with Kids Against Hunger or pack backpacks with healthy food to provide nutritional supplement to lower-income Indianapolis Public School (IPS) children.  Only time will tell the details of the project.  With this level of involvement and excitement, can you imagine the impact that interfaith cooperation could have on hunger?

 

Mark Wolfe

Interfaith Youth Core Fellow

President of the Interfaith Forum

 

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  1. […] was written by Mark Wolfe, IFYC Fellow at the University of Indianapolis.  Read Mark’s blog here.  Follow Mark […]

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